Legend says shadow of Weavers Needle points way to gold in Superstition Mountains


dscf1971Set in the rugged desert landscape of the Superstition Mountains,  Weavers Needle is a column of rock left behind by erosion that forms a distinctive peak that’s visible for many miles around. It’s often mentioned in stories of the Lost Dutchman’s Gold Mine. According to legend, the shadow of the 1,000-foot spire points the way to a rich vein of gold.

Weavers Needle rock formation rises above surrounding landscape
Weavers Needle viewed from Fremont Saddle on Peralta Trail in the Superstition Mountains

Weavers Needle fast facts:

  • Named after mountain man Pauline Weaver
  • 1,000-foot-high (300 m)
  • Summit elevation of 4,555 feet (1,388 m)
  • Created when a thick layer of fused volcanic ash was heavily eroded
  • No permit required to hike to Weaver’s Needle, or to climb it.

Although many treasure hunters have searched and came back empty handed, Weavers Needle itself is the treasure for photographers, hikers, and rock climbers. If you pay close attention, you’ll see it poking up in many pics taken in and around the Superstition Mountains.

Weavers Needle rock formation rises above surrounding landscape
Close up of Weavers Needle

 

Weavers Needle rock formation rises above surrounding landscape
Weavers Needle and Lone Pine – another popular landmark of the Superstition Mountains

The viewpoint of Weavers Needle shown here is roughly a two mile hike from the Peralta Trailhead, accessible from Gold Canyon, AZ. Follow the sign for Peralta Canyon up to Fremont Saddle. From here, you can’t miss it. It’s a moderately difficult hike that requires sturdy shoes. Bring plenty of water, especially in warmer months, as it can get very hot.

Want to see Weavers Needle for yourself? Tap the map

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